Archives For Zach

Hello and welcome back!

(I have posted this same post on zachmalott.com so that all of my readers will be on the same page.  If you read both blogs, I apologize for the redundancy).

It’s good to see you again, however, I would prefer better circumstances!

I am writing this post during my second day in ICU at Lincoln County Medical Center (LCMC) in Ruidoso, New Mexico.  I was stricken by what appeared to be a heart attack and later on found to be an Ileus (intestinal obstruction) and possible internal bleeding.

Heart attack or intestinal obstruction and internal bleeding?  Hmmm, let me think.

I think I will choose bowel obstruction and internal bleeding, thank you very much! 🙂

I apologize for being away from posting for so long, but daily duties of ministry have kept me inordinately busy. Now that I am resting comfortably (finally!) here in the hospital on my vacation, I am on my trusty iPad again! I must say, winding up in the hospital this past Sunday morning at 8:30 was unexpected to say the least!

What happened?

It started with a disoriented feeling, followed by an intense and increasing, dull pain behind my breast bone.  In a few seconds, the pain had moved a little lower and I began to sweat profusely (more like I had just climbed out of a swimming pool depressed in my suit!). Then, the nausea hit like a ton of bricks from a two story building! When I arrived at the hospital, the doctor took the proper precautions for a heart attack.

After many tests and xrays, it was discovered not the be heart involvement but, rather, an intestinal blockage.  Thankfully it wasn’t a heart attack but an intestinal obstruction – so they have been treating me for that.

Enter, the fever.

After all seemed to be going well, I was found to be experiencing a low grade fever that managed to become middle grade within a few hours.  This led to more blood test which turned up a problem with my blood.  I was losing it! My blood volume had dropped significantly in a short period of time.  Tests did not reveal any occult blood so the mystery continues this Tuesday, June 4th, 2013.

My third day in hospital continuing, I am asking for prayer from my readers that the doctors discover the cause and repair it unless God decides to handle it supernaturally, as we all know He can do! At this point, it would be foolish to presume and say that I will be posting on topic soon, so I will just say, “If it’s Almighty God’s will, I shall be posting on topic soon!”

I , God willing, aspire to sharing many posts and spiritual edifications for years to come. As I was lying here in bed last night and the nurse had just finished drawing another series of blood draws, I formulated the title for this post and prepared a brief outline.

Below, are three main things a Christian needs to do when the unexpected happens:

1.  TURN TO GOD IN PRAYER – Don’t forget to praise Him and worship Him.  It is so easy to slip into the me,me,me asking for things and forgetting that we were created for the express purpose of worshiping and praising our God.

2.  BE A POSITIVE WITNESS – Remember who you belong to and who you are representing.  Be the reflection of Jesus the Christ.  Regardless of your unexpected situation, you represent the King of Kings, The Lord of Lords!  He is in total control so reflect His image and show a lost world your complete faith and complete confidence in His work on the cross and His promises!

3.  BE CONCERNED FOR OTHERS OVER YOURSELF – remember to care about and pray unceasingly for others.  When we put others above ourselves, we are truly walking closer in our relationship to Jesus!

Here’s thanking you all in advance for your prayers!

God willing, until next time!

Zach

Question:  Are you putting the needs of others above yourself?

Hello and welcome back!

How are you doing?  I hope this finds you and your family well and productive!  As for me, my wife and I are doing well as are our children.  The weather is improving here by the day.  It’s nice and warm most days and I enjoy running around without wearing a jacket.  Have you ever given thought to what is your favorite time of the year?  I used to consider spring to be my favorite season.  As the years pass, I find that every season has its pros and cons and what one season lacks we receive in the next and so on.

“Do you consider it important to compare the worldview you hold to discover if it answers life’s important questions adequately?”

Life itself is like that, isn’t it?  What one season of life lacks we usually discover in another season of our life.  Some things that we take for granted in one season either takes on more or less importance in another.  The same goes for worldviews at times.  A worldview is the product of many factors.  We are influenced by our culture, our community, our family, and by our own, subjective thoughts revolving around these influences.  Notice that I said our subjective thinking revolving around these influences.  Do you consider it important to compare the worldview you hold to discover if it answers life’s important questions adequately?

There are many worldviews that we will be examining in this category and will now continue with our final examination of secular humanism.  We have taken a look at this worldview in terms of its outlook of human design.  We considered its tenants revolving around humanity’s origin, destiny, and what human life is all about.  In this last post on secular humanism, let’s continue where the last post left off.

In the last segment, we examined secular humanist considerations of important concepts revolving around the human condition.  Such topics are:

 

1)    Existence

2)    Self Responsibility

3)    Reality

4)    Concept of Self

5)    Societal Responsibility

 

This brings us to the wrap-up on secular humanism before we move on to another worldview overview.  We have examined several things in this overview:

 

  • A brief history of secular humanism.
  • The values, morals, and ethics of this worldview.
  • Secular humanism’s human existence theories.
  • Humanity’s purpose.
  • The value of human life.

 

If you wish to review all the posts on secular humanism, they are available in the categories list under secular humanism in the right-hand side bar.  If you wish excellent references for further study on secular humanism, please ask in the comments for this post.

Please comment on the question below to stimulate conversation.  See why this is important here.

Until next time!

Zach

QUESTION:  DOES YOUR WORLDVIEW ALIGN WITH SECULAR HUMANISM?  If NOT, WHAT DO YOU DISAGREE WITH IN TERMS OF SECULAR HUMANISM?

Hello!

You know, I can remember as a child, that the term, values had a meaning that had form and substance about it.  In other words, most (the majority) of the people I ran across held the same, basic ideas in terms of right and wrong.  That basic idea is that truth is truth, regardless of how much a person likes to believe otherwise.

I realize that I come from a very politically incorrect time in history, as far as the definition has meaning today.  That’s the value system of the era in which I was born and raised.  Just a side note, it is the same, basic value system that has been in place throughout the majority of human history.

Today, not so much.

DISCLAIMER:  The author is not completely unbiased on the subject matter under discussion.

Values, Morals, and Ethics

My take on the secular humanist belief system boils down to this.  There are three very important attributes in any belief system that must be considered.  These attributes are values, morals, and ethics.  Let’s take a look at what the secular humanist worldview believes about these three, core attributes of humanity.

Values. 

To quote Paul Kurtz, a noted secular humanist, and I quote: “We believe in the ‘right to privacy.’ This includes freedom of conscience and belief; sexual preference and lifestyle, reproductive rights, contraception, and abortion; euthanasia and death with dignity.”

The way I interpret Mr. Kurtz here is that his description of values is that privacy grants human beings the supreme freedom to believe anything they wish without harboring any guilt of having broken some law or rule that exists outside of their own making.  Is this truth or is it wishful thinking on the part of the secular humanist?

“‘I just don’t like red-headed people so they need to be exterminated,’ someone might suggest.”

Mr. Kurtz also includes sexual preference and lifestyle to be a guilt-free, individualized, and socialized construct that does not revolve around external value rules.  Secular humanism subscribes that mankind is an animal, no better in value than that of the beast in the field.  That being so, this freedom to indulge in bestiality (also known as zoophilia) is approved as long as the humanist doesn’t infringe on the rights of others.  Does this appear to be short-sighted in terms of such behavior having a diverse affect on the psyche of others that is not seen at the time?  Do you agree with this end product of humanism’s guilt-free sexual expression?

Reproductive Rights, Contraception, and abortion.  The humanist worldview sees the world through a lens that values human life in many cases to the same standard of the beast.  If it is not productive to the standard of the current culture, it is expendable.   The term expendable, of course, would revolve around a subjective value that is subject to the whim of the individual.  This would appear to make human life as valuable as the subjective thoughts of those in power at the time.  Does this thinking resonate with your current worldview?

Euthanasia and Death.  Secular Humanism suggests a subjectivism in terms of killing the worthless in the population based on age, limitations, and attitudes.  These and most any other subjective reason that society as a whole or individual political or military regime declares unfit would also be possible from this worldview, could it not?  Does that appear to point to positive human value or just the opposite?  I suppose it all depends on your method of regarding such things, but does your own, particular worldview place mankind on the same level as the beast in the field or in the wild?

Morals

Friedrich Neitzsche once said, “You have your way, I have my way. As for the right way, it does not exist.”  That being said, (by Neitzsche, not me), there is no doubt that he means that the term morals is whatever a person deems it to mean — as long as the person believes in his own mind that he is hurting no one.  Since everything is subjective and self-centered within the worldview of secular humanism, little doubt is left regarding the belief of the humanist in terms of hurting others.   It could easily be argued by the one being hurt, however.

This being the case, the term morals is viewed as subjective rather than objective — which is the age old debate between secular and non-secular worldviews.  We could discuss many instances but I feel that you get the idea without my over analyzing things further.   Let it suffice to say that the moral relativist can become a moral absolutist the moment another person does or says something to which the relativist does not agree with.  It’s rather amazing how innate, absolute truth can come to the fore, isn’t it, when it doesn’t satisfy?

Ethics

Secularism, again, points to the subjective and personal belief of the person and societal belief of the culture surrounding that person.  This means that ethics is relative and subjective in the eyes of the secular humanist.  Is it possible that humanists are confusing tastes for truth?  By that I mean, sure — it’s possible for two people to disagree about their likes and dislikes of a color, a taste, a look, a book, etc.  But tastes are not the same as truth, are they?  Is killing a person because a person doesn’t like them justify it?  Would this not be an example of tastes rather than truth?

“I just don’t like red-headed people so they need to be exterminated,” someone might suggest.  That is how the person feels.  It’s what the person believes.  Belief is not always truth.  Does personal belief justify the murder?

Again, what is truth?  Is it how a person personally feels about something or how a society desires to behave?  Is it something beyond mankind that sets what is right or wrong?

Our time has, again, come to an end!  We shall continue our study of secular humanism and its particular worldview lens in our next post.

Won’t you lease answer the question below and help this blog to serve its intended purpose?

Until next time!

Zach

QUESTION:  WITHOUT EXPANDING ON YOUR ANSWER, DO YOU THINK IT’S POSSIBLE HUMANISTS CONFUSE TRUTH WITH PERSONAL TASTES?

Is Secular Humanism Truth?

Zach —  March 14, 2013 — Leave a comment

Hello!

I apologize to you — my reader — for being so late with a new post on secular humanism. The excuse would be that I have been quite busy this past two weeks finishing the first 8 week sub-semester in a graduate class for professional counseling, ministering with my congregation, and working on sermon materials. Of course, this would be a true and accurate explanation to the lack of posts, however, behind this very true and accurate explanation lies the sinister, hidden truth called, “Mr. Procrastination” who lurks within us all.

Mr. Procrastination appears when we fool ourselves about our time limits. I took an accurate snapshot of where I have spent my time for the past two weeks. The honest truth is that I procrastinated by not managing my time. It has no logical basis because I love writing and I love the reasons that I am writing this blog. Mr. Procrastination does not care one way or another about what I love or do not love. His only concern is procrastination and he can cause us to do it so well.

If this admission has served to motivate even one person to self-examine their reasons for putting off the important, I will be happy. Please accept my humble apology and I will strive not to let Mr. Procrastination to catch up with me again and I will attempt to follow Mr. Responsibility’s example in future!

In case you have not read the first article revolving around secular humanism, please click here if you are interested in reading it NOW to understand the background for this new post. Please understand that these blog posts only represent an overview of the subject matter and each blog post must have a beginning, middle, and an end. This breaks the subject matter up over many weeks, unlike a book that is very linear and broken up into headings, subheadings, and chapters. Being who I am, I will also present blog posts that are not related to the content for the book from time to time. I promise not to veer away from the subject matter for very long, however!

This will be our second blog post on secular humanism. The book, 21st Century Confusion: Finding Your Path to Hope and Purpose, will provide a linear focus about the subject matter while also providing excellent references for further study and research at the end of each chapter for those interested in delving deeper. Let’s continue where the first article, How Secular Humanism Was Born left off.

“The point I am making here is that there is a never ending parade of theories cascading throughout modern history with no end in sight.”

In the first article mentioned above, I provided a link to, The Humanist Manifesto of 1933, which is the belief system that is prevalent on the majority of college and university campuses today. It is making inroads into many Christian colleges and universities as I write this. You can read the last humanist manifesto of 2000 here. Under the banner of liberalism, secular humanism is the underlying worldview being taught in the public school system in Western countries today.

Secular humanism was spawned in the pool of evolutional theory. I would like to introduce a quote from the journal, Scientific American:

“George Wald, another prominent Evolutionist (a Harvard University biochemist and Nobel Laureate), wrote, ‘When it comes to the Origin of Life there are only two possibilities: creation or spontaneous generation. There is no third way. Spontaneous generation was disproved one hundred years ago, but that leads us to only one other conclusion, that of supernatural creation. We cannot accept that on philosophical grounds; therefore, we choose to believe the impossible: that life arose spontaneously by chance!’” (“The Origin of Life,” Scientific American, 191:48, May 1954).

There is a new theory being introduced called, The Black Queen Hypothesis that suggests evolution pushes microorganisms to lose essential functions. This occurs when another species begins to perform these functions. This is counter to popular scientific thinking that living organisms evolve by adding genes instead of discarding them. If interested, here is an article explaining this theory.

The point I am making here is that there is a never ending parade of theories cascading throughout modern history with no end in sight. One theory is popularly accepted only to be replaced by another popularly accepted humanist theory that revolves around humanistic evolution: nothing proven — just speculation until the next theory comes along. A theory is just that, speculation. Is a worldview that is constantly changing its core belief one that provides security for its proponents? Faith can only come from the belief that something is true. If it ever changes, what you believed in is not true.

This is neither proof for or against evolution. This is just being provided here as a heads up to consider the options. All that glitters is not gold. Paul Kurtz wrote in the Council for Secular Humanism on March 14, 2013, and I quote:

“The evolution of the human species by means of natural selection has been an especially tortuous process; for other Homo species have become extinct—Homo habilis, Homo erectus, Homo neanderthalis. Only Homo sapiens has endured in spite of hazardous adversities. That our species has managed to survive thus far is due to luck and human pluck.”

He goes on to say:

“The meaning of life is intimately tied up with our plans and projects, the goals we set for ourselves, our dreams, and the successful achievement of them. We create our own conscious meanings; we invest the cultural and natural worlds with our own interpretations. We discover, impose upon, and add to nature.”

If this hypothesis is correct, it is a selfish one and appears void of any hope and purpose for what is the purpose of striving forward into oblivion in a world void of all hope.

In the next post on secular humanism, we will examine what this worldview provides for those who subscribe to it.

Until next time!

Zach

QUESTION: DOES SECULAR HUMANISM PROVIDE A SATISFACTORY ANSWER TO YOUR QUESTIONS ABOUT LIFE?

 

How Secular Humanism Was Born

Zach —  February 11, 2013 — 2 Comments

I love the part of the country that I work and live in!  I just returned from a brisk walk in nothing but blue jeans and a long-sleeved shirt.  A slight breeze was blowing but not enough wind to require a jacket or coat!  Looking at other parts of the country, I was almost feeling smug when it dawned on me that humility is the better attitude.

I gave thanks to God for the weather that I was experiencing and repented for that moment of self!  Ahhh, what a country though!  Walking in February without a jacket!  An in the mountains to boot!

As I was walking, I began to think of the many worldviews that people see the world through.

“I wonder how I would see this beautiful day if I was looking at it through the eyes of someone with a secular humanistic worldview lens?”  I thought as I walked through the beautiful scenery while smelling the scents of nature and looking at what I believe to be God’s creation.

These thoughts continued to entertain my thinking as I walked along.  These thoughts continued to challenge my thinking as I returned home and began preparing to write this new post.  I prepared my cup of coffee and headed for my office.  As I sat down and opened my laptop, I could not but help think about the historical origin of secular humanism.

Secular humanism, once confined to a small group of philosophical thinkers until around the middle of the 19th century, when some intellectuals began to declare that religion was not a viable belief system and was born from ignorance or by self-serving priests.

 “Insofar as men have now lost their belief in a heavenly king…”

— Lippmann

These thinkers believed that religion was the enemy of scientific thinking and that more reasonable substitutes needed to replace such archaic thinking.  Auguste Comte in the first half of the 19th century introduced what he coined a Religion of Humanity which was a combining of ideas from Roman Catholic religion and atheism (a belief that there is no such thing as God).  The key factor to consider is that this Religion of Humanity was Comte’s subjective belief.

The term humanism to define an atheist worldview was first used in the first decade of the 20th century.  A Unitarian minister by the name John H. Dietrich in 1913 but the term was put into mass usage by Walter Lippmann in 1929 in his best-selling book, A Preface to Morals.  The following is a direct quote from Lippmann’s book:

“Insofar as men have now lost their belief in a heavenly king, they have to find some other ground for their moral choices than the revelation of his will. It follows necessarily that they must find the tests of righteousness wholly within human experience.”

The usage of the term humanism as it is used today to denote belief in man rather than a transcendent God the creator was established in The Humanist Manifesto in 1933

 In the next post, we will continue examining secular humanism.  Please give your comments to the question below as this adds to the value of this blog and helps me to focus the direction of the book and allows you the opportunity to become a part of it all!

Until next time!

~Zach

 

Question: Please give your thoughts on the topic of secular humanism?

Discover Your Worldview!

Zach —  January 29, 2013 — 2 Comments

Things have changed outside of my study window.  I woke up to falling, blowing snow!  I had just pulled up the blog on my laptop and was ready to write today’s blog post when a scene out of my window caught my eye.  A small deer was rubbing noses with my neighbor’s dog.  Nothing unusual about that, I suppose but still, it kept coming back into my mind.

As I turned back to my monitor, it hit me—the deer and the dog.  They were interested in checking one another out.  There was no fighting or intimidation, just a natural curiosity about the other.  It was beautiful.  What had hit me was that they reminded me of two different worldviews.  I was captivated by that thought and this post is the outward expression of that thought.

“Amazing,” I thought, “two, completely different animals (worldviews) tentatively investigating the other!”  As I thought about that for a moment, I caught movement out my window and looked to see both the small deer and the dog walking side by side around the side of an embankment.

I thought to myself, “That is how I will describe the subjectivity of worldviews today!  Like the deer and my neighbor’s dog, both of them from different concepts about the world but willing to acknowledge the other.  When we understand other peoples worldviews, perhaps we can really appreciate our own even more!

If you have been keeping up with the blog posts, you know that we are about to begin looking into the worldview, human secularism.  Before we go any further, how about we take a look at a chart that will allow you to determine for yourself what your personal worldview is?  Sound good?

The following links open in another window so when finished just click off of that window to return here.  Ok then, take a break in your reading and I will wait for you to return.  Look over the chart ,answer the questions, follow the arrows, and you will find your worldview.  Ok –get ready, get set, click…What’s Your Worldview?

Welcome back!  Well, now you have an idea of what your worldview is and what it is called.  I have another chart I would like you to look over.     Worldview Comparison Chart.    After you see what your worldview believes in, come back !

If you clicked on the two links above and followed the instructions, you have a pretty good idea of what your personal worldview is.  Many people already know their worldview but many more do not.  This exercise is to get you ready to investigate the various worldviews and what they believe.

Next post, we will consider the worldview of human secularism.  I look forward to investigating with you!

Until then!

Zach

 

Question:  What was your worldview?  What are your thoughts on it?

 

 

It starts with a pain, not a definitive one—just this nagging ache running down your left arm.  You’ve heard that this is one of the signs of a heart attack but you’re too young for such things.  You begin to feel a tightness spreading through your chest and the pain in your arm begins to increase.

“Man, I feel weird,” you think as you ease yourself down on the couch, rubbing your left arm and clenching and unclenching your fist.  You think, “Maybe I should call someone,” but you reason that it would be so embarrassing when it goes away and you have to explain you were scared.

Then, it hits.

 “The end of your life is staring you back in the eyes, up close—eyeball to eyeball.”

Your jaw begins to feel a pain like your teeth are hurting.  The pain increases.

“This can’t be real!” you think as the pain overwhelms you and a descending darkness, like the fade at the end of a movie, blurs and coats your vision like a pull down shade.  You can’t move now and the pain is unbearable.  You know.  You just know.

“ It’s impossible.  This can’t happen to me!”

But, there it is.  It’s fact.  You are dying.

In that moment, during the time after you sit down on the couch, the realization that you may be dying hits you right in the reality.

“What’s going to happen to me if I die?”  Your mind screams as the terror mounts and you begin fading into yourself and a numbing coldness starts moving from your extremities towards your middle, toward your heart.  Then—you’re gone.

Where did you go?

Where will you wake up?

What are you now?

These and other questions are answered by the worldview that you hold.  What is the last thought that runs through your mind as death slowly—but inescapably— claims you?

 Let’s run the clock back.

 Like an old VCR tape, you see yourself speeding back second by second into the past to where you were just before the first realization that something drastically wrong was about to play out.  Every thought of the past 15 minutes is as clear and as vivid as anything you have ever experienced in your life.

The past 15 minutes are all that you can think about as you realize what is about to happen.  What are your thoughts now?  Are you thinking about it as you read these words?  You remember laughing with others about,

“Oh well, might as well enjoy life to the max!  We’re not goin’ to ever get out of this world alive!”  Or perhaps you remember thinking,

“Everyone dies, but I don’t want to dwell on such things.  Just live each day to the fullest!”

 Maybe the following invades your memory as you await that first pain of the heart attack you know is coming and that is going to end your life in the next 15 minutes.

“Hey Bill,” your friend asks as you down another beer and slap down another grain-fed steak at the neighborhood, Sunday night cookout.

You love these outings that are held each weekend in the Spring and Summer months.  In fact, you started them 8 years after that Spring when you moved into the neighborhood.

“Let’s run down and get another case after this steak and watch the game!”  He laughs uproariously.  “ Only the good die young and we be bad to da bone!”

“Ok,” you belch—scarf down the last bite—and drain one beer and reach for another, “Let’s go!”

 

  • What is your worldview about death?
  •  Are you afraid of dying?
  •  Do you think about it?
  •  Do your hide from the realities of it? 
  • Are you comfortable with it?
  • Are you aware of what others think about it? 
  • How about your friends?
  • Your fellow employees where you work?
  • Then there’s your spouse and kids?
  • What are you teaching your kids about death?

 

What do you fear, what you think about, what do you hide from, how how can you become comfortable with death, what do you discuss with others, teach your kids?  It all depends upon how you view the world around you. Please be thinking on the above questions.

 In the next post, we will begin to consider the major world views mentioned in the post, How To See Out Of The Window.

The first worldview we will investigate is that of human secularism.  I look forward to coming alongside you as we investigate this prevalent, 21st century worldview.

Until then!

Zach

 

Question:  What is your greatest fear and how does it look from your worldview?

“Your Right and I’m Wrong?”

Zach —  January 19, 2013 — 4 Comments

“Your Right And I’m Wrong?”

Ruidoso is experiencing blue skies and calm winds today.  Again, I am taking in nature from my study window and actually thinking of donning my hiking clothes and boots and getting out in it!  There is something about the sound of a bird’s whistle and a faint breeze bringing the scents of nature to your senses that stirs and inspires motivation!

As I focus on the task at hand, I remember a conversation I had outside Wal-Mart a couple of months ago.

He looks startled as I approach with a tract in hand.  Looking from my face to my hand , he asks, “What’s that?”

“Hi, I wanted to ask you if you got one of these,” I state upfront as I offer my hand to shake in greeting.

“Whatever it is, I don’t want it,” he mutters and turns away.

“Wait!” I say as he turns back towards me and glowers.  “I would love to ask you a question if you don’t mind,” I offer and wait for his reply.  He looks at my hand but still does not offer his.

“Yeah?” he queries, “What kind of question?”  He looks suspiciously into my eyes as I mentally calculate just how I want to proceed now that I have his attention.  After a few seconds – to compose my thinking – I offer, “Do you think that you’re a good person?”  He just looks quizzically at me.

“Now, what kind of a question is that to ask a stranger in the street?” he half laughs, half sneers as I respond without any hesitation,  “Do you?”  I wait as he appears to mull the question over in his mind – half ready to walk away but curious enough about what I am up to, asks smugly, “Of course I am, are you?”

“Because you’re wrong!” he shouts back.  He is still glaring at me when I ask more softly…

We fence for awhile, back and forth, until he finally counters, “Look, truth is relative!  You see things your way and I see it my way!  I know you don’t think this way but we are both right,” he says in consternation and what appears to be a look of dismissal.  “What I believe is right for me and I have no problem with you believing what you do, okkk?” he sarcastically states and then begins to turn away.

“Wait, just one more question,” I say, raising my voice just enough to get his attention, “Why don’t you agree with what I just stated?” I say, waiting now for his answer.

“Because you’re wrong!” he shouts back.  He is still glaring at me when I ask more softly.

“So you’re right and I’m wrong?  What happened to we are both subjectively right?” I finish.  He begins to turn beet red as his mouth opens to make some retort.  Slowly, a light seems to appear in his eyes and he closes his mouth, looks down and back to meet my eyes.  He just looks at me for about 10 seconds, turns on his heel, and walks away.

  • Different worldviews have different perspectives. 
  • Different worldviews have different lenses in the glasses.
  • Different paradigms have a different focus.

All worldviews are different in most perspectives but they all have one thing in common.  They have a believer who contends for them.  All believe that their worldview is correct.  There are some philosophical thinkers who concede that no one has a handle on absolute truth; therefore, they will allow that their belief might have flaws.

However, they hold to possibly flawed paradigms until something subjectively influences them to change.  Then they will tentatively conclude that their view needs adjustment.  With that being said, they only change their view in the subjective context within their own minds.

As we consider different worldviews on this blog, we will look at both secular and religious ones.  We will look at the pros and the cons.  We will compare and contrast.  We will analyze, construct and deconstruct.  Overall, we will glean a set of skills, allowing us to analyze our own, particular worldview in as unbiased a manner as we possibly can.

I look forward to this journey with you!  Please consider the question below and comment on it as part of adding your focus to this post.

Until next time!

Zach

 

QUESTION:  IN THE WORDS OF PILATE –WHAT IS TRUTH?